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    Age group uses dating sites

    Darwin The Darwin website by the American Museum of Natural History puts Darwin and his theories in historical context and provides much scientific, social, and personal information about the man and his theory of evolution.Of note is the “Controversies Timelines” that chronologically outlines the (often fiery) debate over his theories.Fossil Fragments: The Riddle of Human Origins This offering from Yale University is based on a 2004 exhibition and explores the history of fossil hunting and fossils themselves.The history section is essentially an essay, but the rest of the site is highly visual and features great up-close photos of bronze age and neanderthal skulls.The site is primarily text-based, aside from images there is limited multimedia, apart from a video of Darwin’s home and a few audio excerpts.The Story of Africa: Early History This BBC site features Africa’s top historians and analyzes the events and characters that have shaped the continent from the origins of humankind to the end of South African apartheid.The Ages of Treasures Timeline showcases some of Britain’s finest archaeological artifacts while The Multimedia Zone has several fun simulations, including Hunt the Ancestor, Iron Age Life, Diver’s Quest, Wetwang Chariot, Roundhouse, and the Dig Deeper Quiz.Visit the Stonehenge Dig section for video of the historic Timewatch dig.

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    Interesting features include Meet the Ancestors which provides a visual side-by-side examination of man, chimpanzees, and neanderthals.

    The Natural World section includes an Ice Age timeline with “cold” facts, and an interactive timeline of the warm/cold cycle.

    The site also has information on excavation techniques.

    Before Lucy came Ardi, new earliest hominid found Associated Press, October 1, 2009 — “Ardi,” a 110-pound, 4-foot female hominid who lived 4.4 million years ago in what is now Ethiopia roamed forests a million years before the famous Lucy, long studied as the earliest skeleton of a human ancestor.

    Prehistoric man ‘used crude sat nav’ Telegraph, September 15, 2009 — Prehistoric man navigated his way across England using a crude version of sat nav based on stone circle markers, historians have claimed.

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